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Housing Information (For adults aged 18 years +)

This page contains information and explores the housing options available for people with a learning disability or additional needs.

Basic Information

A residential home provides a home and support for people with a learning disability that need lots of care and support in their lives. All care homes are registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). Residential care homes are staffed up to 24 hours a day.Many people who live in residential homes receive benefits that pay for their housing, food, bills, and care costs. They also receive a small weekly personal allowance. Residential homes can be small and homely with just a few people, or much bigger homes with many more people living there. Some people with learning disabilities still live in residential homes in the East Riding but this is changing. More people now choose other housing options which better support their independence and individuality.

Living in a residential home

A residential home also called a registered care home, is an option for some people with a learning disability in the East Riding who have an assessed high level of need. People who live in care homes are people who need extra help to look after themselves and keep themselves safe.

In a residential home, accommodation and support are provided in the same building by the same organisation/group of staff. People living in a care home usually have their own bedroom and share other rooms such as the lounge with other residents.

A residential home is a home for people who share a similar disability so people with a learning disability with the same sorts of needs would tend to live together. Residential homes can vary greatly in size. They offer care and support to people for up to 24 hours per day.

Most homes are either privately-owned or are owned by charities but a small number are owned by East Riding of Yorkshire Council. All are registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) which makes sure each service is regulated and of a good standard.

If you live in a residential home, most of your benefits (money) you get goes towards paying for your place in the care home and your care costs. You will receive a small personal allowance for your other expenses.

To live in a residential home you will have to have an assessment of your needs by East Riding of Yorkshire Council Adult Services to say that this is the sort of care that you need. For more information contact your Care Management Team e.g. social worker or care co-ordinator, if you have one or East Riding of Yorkshire Council on 01482 393939 to request an assessment.

Some advantages and disadvantages of living in a care home:

Advantages

The home looks after your care, cooking, housing and support and most of the financial aspects of your placement are managed on your behalf.

There will be other people to talk to and socialise within your home.

Hopefully, this will make you feel secure and not isolated. Standards of care homes are monitored by the local authority and the Care Quality Commission.

Disadvantages

You have limited choice and control about who you share the home with. The staff are there to look after all resident’s needs, not only yours.

You get only a small personal allowance each week for your expenses.

You have less security of tenure because you are a resident and not a home owner or tenant.

Basic Information

Through the East Riding of Yorkshire Council Shared Lives scheme you can live with another family, a couple or a single person, in their home.

You will have your own bedroom and share the other rooms in the house.

You can spend time with the Shared Lives carer’s family and friends as well as with your own friends and relatives.

The Shared Lives carer gets paid your rent and support you to develop your skills, independence, social life and confidence.

If you feel this might be a good option for you then you could speak to your Care Management Team e.g social worker or care co-ordinator, if you have one or East Riding of Yorkshire Council on 01482 393939 to request an assessment.

Shared Lives full-time placement

In Shared Lives, you can live in the home of a Shared Lives carer as part of the carer’s household. You can share everyday life with other people, for example eating together, going out shopping, going to the cinema and going on holiday.

Shared Lives carers come from lots of different backgrounds and households. They may be families, couples or single people. All Shared Lives carers will be assessed, trained and background checks will be completed before anyone is placed with them.

Shared lives placements have between one to a maximum of three people in the same home.

Shared Lives schemes are registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). You would be matched with a Shared Lives carer who has similar interests to you.

Support is given to both the Shared Lives carers and the people living with them. The Shared Lives carers are paid for the accommodation and support that they provide to people who are placed with them according to how much support they provide.

You can have your own bedroom and share other facilities in the house, but you would not have the same rights as a homeowner or tenant. In shared lives placement, you will be encouraged to live as independently as possible and maintain relationships with your family and friends.

For more information contact your Care Management Team e.g. social worker or care co-ordinator, if you have one or East Riding of Yorkshire Council on 01482 393939 to request an assessment.

Some advantages and disadvantages of living in a Shared Lives placement:

Advantages

You get to experience life in an ordinary home and as part of the community while being supported.

Your daily needs will be taken care of by your Shared Lives carer or through other support.

You will contribute towards the rent and household expenses from your benefits. The rest of your money is for personal expenses.

You will be encouraged to become more independent and to develop your social and life skills.

You can live with a shared lives family on your own or with one or two more people.

Disadvantages

Arranging a Shared Lives placement can sometimes take time depending on the availability of Shared Lives carers.

You don’t have the same rights as a tenant or homeowner.

Your daily needs will be taken care of by your Shared Lives carer or through other support.

Basic information

Supported living usually means your housing and support is built around you rather than you fitting into a service. You can choose to live alone or live with, or close to, other people like yourself. You may want to choose where you would like to live but you may need to be flexible to give yourself more options.

There are two main forms of supported living which you can rent:

  1. Where you share a house, live in a self-contained flat in a block or a group of bungalows and have support from a support provider to meet your needs, this could be for up to 24 hours a day/7 days a week. This is where the support you get is provided by on-site staff with the accommodation. This is called accommodation-based support.
  2. Where you live inside your own property or have a flat within a group of similar properties and you receive daily or weekly support to meet your needs, this could be for a few hours from a support provider. This is called floating, or outreach support.

Supported housing

Supported living is a housing and support option that is becoming more and more popular in the East Riding. It is an alternative to residential care for many people with a learning disability or special needs.

There are two common forms of supported living:

  1. Where a person with a disability has their own home and the support they need visits them in their home on a daily or weekly basis. This form of support is called floating or outreach support and may be in the form of domiciliary care or homecare.
  2. Where the support provided is based in or tied to a property or accommodation. Support will be provided on-site to meet your needs, which could be for up to 24 hours. This is called accommodation based support. You will probably only need one housing option but you may need a package of different support, - either accommodation-based or floating support depending on your circumstances and needs.

To set up or move into a supported living service you will probably need support from someone like a social worker. They will tell you whether you are eligible for support services and whether supported living would suit your needs. They will help you work out the best way to get the most appropriate accommodation and support that meets your needs.

For more information contact your Care Management Team e.g social worker or care co-ordinator, if you have one or East Riding of Yorkshire Council on 01482 393939 to request an assessment.

Some advantages and disadvantages of supported housing:

Advantages

Potentially, you will have more choice and control over where you live, who you live with, and how you are supported.

You should have more opportunities to be as independent as you are able. 

Living in your own home as an owner or tenant allows you greater rights to decide how long you wish to stay there.

You may be able to claim for other benefits to help with your housing costs.

You will live as part of the wider community.

Disadvantages

Supported living is generally set up as two separate processes, accommodation and support, - so it can be quite complicated to do.

People living on their own in supported living can sometimes feel lonely and vulnerable.

Basic Information

All people with learning disabilities can apply to rent a home from the Council.

To rent a council home in the East Riding you need to join the Council’s housing waiting list. Your application will tell people what your housing needs are and will let them know what your situation is.

Renting from the Council can be a good option because rents can be a lower cost compared to other rented properties and you can usually stay in your home as long as you need to. The Council also makes sure the properties are looked after and in a good state of repair.

Renting from the council

Renting from the Council is a way some people with a learning disability can get an affordable place to live. To be considered for a council property you need to put your name on the Council’s housing waiting list. Once you have registered you will be considered for suitable properties which meet your needs. If you are offered a property you can visit and decide if it is the one for you.

If you think that living in a council house is an option that might work for you, you will need an assessment of your housing and support needs from a social worker. They will tell you whether you are eligible for services and how much it will cost you. They will help you work out the best way for you to get the most appropriate accommodation and support.

For more information contact your Care Management Team e.g social worker or care co-ordinator, if you have one or East Riding of Yorkshire Council on 01482 393939 to request an assessment.

Some advantages and disadvantages of renting from the council:

Advantages

The council offers a range of housing throughout the East Riding which gives you some choice of where you decide to live.

A council tenancy offers you excellent security. You can live in your home as long as you wish as long as you remain a good tenant.

Council rents can be a lower cost compared to other forms of renting.

The property should be well-maintained and properly repaired.

A tenant can get advice and help on looking after their home e.g. repairs advice, energy advice and general help.

Disadvantages

There is only a limited amount of vacant properties available.

Some parts of the East Riding are very popular places to live. So you may have to wait a long time before any properties become vacant.

Basic information

Housing associations provide homes for people on lower incomes and people with special needs including those who have a learning disability.

Housing associations in the East Riding provide rented accommodation for single people and families, as well as supported housing.

You can get in touch with individual housing associations in the East Riding to find out what properties they have available to rent. Then you can decide which ones to apply for.

Housing associations usually offer a good standard of properties with secure tenancies and the rents can be a lower cost compared to other forms of renting.

Renting from a housing association 

Housing associations are independent not-for-profit organisations that provide low-cost social housing. 

Much of the supported accommodation for people with learning disabilities in the East Riding is currently provided by housing associations. 

Renting from a housing association is a way some people with learning disabilities in the East Riding are able to get their own low-cost place to live.

You can contact housing associations directly to find out what properties they have available to rent. 

If you have support needs and think that living in a housing association property is an option that might work for you, you will need an assessment from a social worker. They will tell you whether you are eligible for services and how much it will cost you. They will help you work out the best way for you to get the most appropriate accommodation and support. 

For more information, talk to your Care Management Team e.g social worker or care co-ordinator, if you have one or East Riding of Yorkshire Council on 01482 393939 to request an assessment.

Some advantages and disadvantages of renting from a housing association:

Advantages

Housing associations are generally good quality landlords and will sometimes offer additional housing support for tenants with special needs.

Many housing associations offer secure tenancies for people so they can live in rented homes for long periods.

The rent charges are set as Fair Rents so should be affordable and some people can claim housing benefit.

Disadvantages

Some housing associations only have accommodation in certain areas and some vacancies will not always be advertised. This means you may need to contact individual housing associations to find out what they have available to rent.

Some housing associations provide mainly specialised housing just for certain groups such as older people or people with mental ill-health.

Some housing associations have long waiting lists so you may have to wait a long time until suitable properties become available.

Basic information

Many people with a learning disability choose to rent a home from a private landlord because this can be a quick and easy way to find suitable housing especially in popular areas.

To find a privately-rented home you can go through an estate agent, direct to the landlord, or through adverts in newspapers and newsagents. Another good way of finding properties for rent is looking on the internet.

You don’t have the right to stay as long you like and once your fixed term agreement runs out it is up to the landlord how long you can stay. Most agreements are for six months after you might be able to stay but you could be asked to find a new place to live.

The rent you pay each month may be expensive and you will probably have to pay a deposit.

Before you sign a tenancy for a property you need to make sure you can afford the rent - Housing Benefit may not meet the full rent. 

The standard of private rented homes and the service you get from a private landlord varies a lot. You should think about getting some advice before signing any tenancy.

Renting from a private landlord

More people with learning disabilities now rent homes from private landlords. Renting from a private landlord is sometimes a quicker and easier way to find suitable housing in the East Riding than waiting for council or housing association properties to become available. This is particularly the case in popular areas.

Some of the best ways of finding suitable housing for rent from private landlords is by looking through the property pages in your local newspapers or by going to see a letting or estate agent. Other good places to search are advertisements in shops or by using popular property websites such as www.rightmove.co.uk

If you think living in private rented accommodation might work for you, you will need an assessment of your housing and support needs from a social worker.

They will tell you if you are eligible for services and how much it will cost you. They will also help you get the most appropriate accommodation and support to meet your needs. 

The quality of landlords often varies so you could contact East Riding of Yorkshire has a Landlord Accreditation Scheme which private landlords

can sign up to which indicates that they have agreed to meet certain standards of accommodation.

For more information, talk to your Care Management Team e.g social worker or care co-ordinator, if you have one or East Riding of Yorkshire Council on 01482 393939 to request an assessment.

Some advantages and disadvantages of renting from a private landlord:

Advantages

Private rented property can be sometimes quicker and easier way to find the sort of property you want.

There is likely to be private rented property available in the more sought after areas.

You can use internet sites like www.rightmove.co.uk and other ways to find available property.

By renting from a landlord who has signed up to the Council’s landlord Accreditation Scheme you should usually be guaranteed a good standard of accommodation.

Disadvantages

Rents on private properties are often more expensive than rents on council or housing association properties plus the quality of private landlords often varies.

You may need to pay rent-in-advance and damage deposits when you rent private properties. So you may need a lot of cash up front.

If you are on a low income you will need to check if you can afford the deposit and the rent before you sign any tenancy agreement with a landlord.

Most Landlords will only offer short-hold tenancies. You will not have long-term security of tenure and your landlord could ask you to find somewhere else to live.

Basic information

Your relatives could help you find the right place to live.

If your family members have enough money, they might decide to set up a trust to buy a home for you.

They could buy a home and rent it out to you.

Or a group of families could put money together to buy a house to rent out to their relatives with disabilities.

Family investment in housing

Family members could help a person with a learning disability to get a home of their own.They could do this in a number of different ways:

Outright purchase

Your relatives may be able to buy a property, without borrowing, for you to live in.

Shared ownership

A family member may fund part of the cost of a Shared Ownership home.

Joint ownership

A group of families could put some money together to buy an existing property or build a new one for you and their family members to live in.

Company ownership

A group of people or families could form a company to buy or build a property.

Buy to rent

A property is bought to rent out. But you may need to make sure you can claim housing benefit with this option.

Inheritance

A property is directly inherited. Or the property is sold and the proceeds are used to buy another property outright or on Shared Ownership terms.

Property in a discretionary trust

Instead of direct inheritance, the property is put into a Trust. 

If your family is interested in the idea of investing in housing for you and you think that owning your own home might work for you, you will need an assessment of your housing and support needs by a social worker.  They will tell you whether you are eligible for services and how much it will cost you.  

Before buying a property you must make sure you have enough money to pay for your household costs which will include food, gas, electricity, water rates and council tax and repairs on your home.

If you decide to share your house with other people then you need to find the people you want to live with and they will need an assessment of their housing and support needs by a social worker to check they are eligible for services. They must also make sure they have enough money to pay the rent and household bills.

Some advantages and disadvantages of family investment in housing:

Advantages

People with a learning disability and their families will have more control over where and how the person lives.

You are more likely to get a home near where you want to be.

You may have an asset that is worth money.

If you want to share your home you can choose who you live with.

Disadvantages

Investment costs money. The value of the property may go down as well as up.

The different ways of investing can be very complicated.

The property will need maintaining and looking after.

If you want to live with other people you may not be able to find anyone to share with.

You may not have enough money to pay for your care and support and other household costs.

Page last updated: Thursday, 23 February 2017