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Educational Psychology Service

Description

The Educational Psychology Service is made up of Educational Psychologists, Inclusion Practitioners, Assistant Psychologists and Trainee Educational Psychologists. A description of the roles of everyone who works in the Service is in the leaflet below. The different roles of practitioners in the educational psychology service

More information about Inclusion Practitioners can be found on a separate webpage here http://www.eastridinglocaloffer.org.uk/directory/?category=Education_All&entry=inclusion_practitioners

The Educational Psychology Service works with education settings, parents/ carers, local authority officers and a range of agencies to help find solutions to improve the learning and social/emotional wellbeing of children and young people.

Educational Psychologists (EPs) have qualifications in psychology and experience working with children/young people with a range of special educational needs and/or disability (SEND). They understand how children/young people learn and what things can make learning difficult, and use their knowledge of psychology to help children/young people make progress.

Assistant Psychologists support the work of the Educational Psychologist.

What Educational Psychologists do?

The National Occupational Standards (British Psychological Society) requires EPs to work at 3 levels:

  • The level of the individual child/young person and their family
  • The level of the education setting (class, school or school cluster)
  • The level of the local authority and corporate partners (eg health)

At each level EPs provide the following core activities:

  • Consultation and advice
  • Psychological assessments and evidence-informed interventions
  • Delivery of professional development and training
  • Research and evaluation

EPs also provide critical incident support to education settings in the event of an unexpected death or serious injury to a pupil or member of staff. Information about this is in the leaflet below How educational psychologists help education settings manage critical incidents

Examples of the range of work activities the Service is currently involved with is in the leaflet below Core activities of the Service.

All our work focuses on promoting equal opportunities and inclusion for children and young people. In particular those who are most vulnerable. For example, have special educational needs and/or disability, are or have been looked after, are at risk of social or educational exclusion).

For the majority of time, EPs provide psychological services to support children and young people in education settings. EPs are most effective when they work together with the adults who have regular and direct contact with the child/young person - usually staff in the education setting and parents/carers. EPs help the adults to have a better understanding of the child/young person’s needs which then helps them to develop a plan to support the child/young person

EPs provide psychological advice and support to others by using a consultation model and information about this model will be uploaded on this webpage soon

Sometimes, EPs find it helpful to meet and work directly with a child/young person. This is always with the parent/carers consent and the agreement of the child/young person. EPs sometimes observe the child/young person learning, ask them their views of what’s going well and what areas they feel they need support with. EPs might also ask them to complete assessments which can help identify particular learning and wellbeing strengths and areas of need.

Further information about what we do to support children and young people with SEND, including the types of assessments we carry out, can be found in the leaflet below. How educational psychologists support children and young people with SEND

EPs work to support children and young people with a range of SEND or who have particular vulnerabilities, including those who are looked after or have previously been looked after. Information about Children looked after can be found here: https://www.eastriding.gov.uk/living/children-and-families/childrens-social-care/children-in-care/vulnerable-children-education-team/ . EPs have produced booklets for schools and for early years settings to help them support Children Looked After and these can be found on the webpage above and below (add CLA leaflets)

Access to this service

When an education setting (usually the School’s SENCo) has identified that a child/young person has special educational needs and/or a disability (SEND), the setting is required to put in place strategies and interventions to try to address the areas of need as part of the ‘graduated response’. Information about the graduated response can be found on the Local Offer here http://eastridinglocaloffer.org.uk/education/education-support/special-educational-needs-support-in-schools/

Many children/young people with SEND do not need involvement by an EP. However, if there are significant concerns about the child/young person’s progress, then the SENCo, with parent/carer consent, can seek advice from an EP at one of the planning meetings which take place between the SENCo and the education settings EP.

For preschool children attending a private, voluntary or independent early years setting, access to support from an EP is through discussion with East Riding’s Early Years Support Team. Information about the Early Years Support Team can be found here http://eastridinglocaloffer.org.uk/care-and-support/early-years-and-childcare/early-years-support/     Information about how EPs support pre-school children can be found in the leaflet below How educational Psychologists support pre-school children with SEND

If, after these discussions, the EP agrees there will be benefit from their involvement, the SENCo and parent/carer is asked to complete a ‘Request for involvement by an educational psychologist form’ which is below. After the EP receives this, a consultation meeting is arranged to discuss the concerns and agree how best the EP can become involved to help.

Any parent/carer who has concerns about their child’s learning is advised to discuss their worries with the education setting’s SENCo in the first instance. Similarly, if a child/young person is worried about how they are getting on at school, we advise them to speak to their parent/carer and to the SENCo or another trusted member of the school staff.

We have developed a leaflet for parents/carers which explains the role of an EP. Information for parents and carers and a leaflet for children/young people which explains what we do Information for children and young people at school. Both leaflets are below

If other professionals, such as a GP or Speech and Language Therapist has concerns about a child/young person and feel there may be a role for an EP, they are advised to discuss their concerns with the education setting’s SENCo, who can consider if involvement by the EP if appropriate.

Who this service is for

We provide consultation and psychological advice to educational settings in the East Riding of Yorkshire Council. We work to support children/young people with a range of special educational needs and vulnerabilities. A child/young person does not need to have a medical diagnosis (eg Autism) for us to become involved and children/young people with a diagnosis don’t automatically need involvement by our Service.

If a parent/carer is looking for an assessment because they think their child may have Autism, then it is the East Yorkshire Children’s Autism Team (EYCAT) that agrees to and carries out the assessment for Autism. Information about EYCAT can be found here

The following services can refer a child or young person to EYCAT:

  • Speech and Language Therapy
  • Portage Service
  • Educational Psychology Service
  • Community Paediatrics
  • Children and Adolescents Mental Health Service (CAMHS)
  • Children’s Learning Disability Team 

An EP would consider making a referral to EYCAT if they are already involved with the children/young people and where Autism is considered to be a factor contributing towards the child/young person’s special educational needs. This referral to EYCAT would be made with the parent/carer/young person's consent.

How we communicate with children, young people with SEND and their families

Parents/carers are always invited to the consultation meetings and the review meetings and may want to be present if any individual work is carried out with their child. We always provide a written record following a consultation meeting, and a written record of all work we do with a child/young person (eg observation, individual meetings) is send to the family and the education setting. We are always happy to meet with parents/carers to discuss and explain what we’ve written.

All information we collect and store about children and young people is respected and looked after in line with GDPR requirements (General Data Protection Regulation)

We would like to hear back from children or young people

Are you a child or young person, or a family with child or young person who has worked with this team directly? If the answer is yes we would like to hear about the experience you had whilst working with them.

Please follow the link below for the opportunity to feedback directly to the team, and all feedback is anonymous.

Smartsurvey - Children's and Young People's Feedback Survey (external website)

Parking and accessibility
Services provided at school.
Registered service and regulatory body

All Educational Psychologists are registered with the Health and Care Professionals Council (HCPC).

Staff training and experience

EPs have a degree in Psychology and a post graduate degree in Educational Psychology. EPs regularly undertake continued professional development related to supporting children/young people with a range of needs.

Contact
Educational Psychology Service
(01482) 394000 - Option 4 then option 2
County Hall
Cross Street
Beverley
HU17 9BA
Back
Description

The Educational Psychology Service is made up of Educational Psychologists, Inclusion Practitioners, Assistant Psychologists and Trainee Educational Psychologists. A description of the roles of everyone who works in the Service is in the leaflet below. The different roles of practitioners in the educational psychology service

More information about Inclusion Practitioners can be found on a separate webpage here http://www.eastridinglocaloffer.org.uk/directory/?category=Education_All&entry=inclusion_practitioners

The Educational Psychology Service works with education settings, parents/ carers, local authority officers and a range of agencies to help find solutions to improve the learning and social/emotional wellbeing of children and young people.

Educational Psychologists (EPs) have qualifications in psychology and experience working with children/young people with a range of special educational needs and/or disability (SEND). They understand how children/young people learn and what things can make learning difficult, and use their knowledge of psychology to help children/young people make progress.

Assistant Psychologists support the work of the Educational Psychologist.

What Educational Psychologists do?

The National Occupational Standards (British Psychological Society) requires EPs to work at 3 levels:

  • The level of the individual child/young person and their family
  • The level of the education setting (class, school or school cluster)
  • The level of the local authority and corporate partners (eg health)

At each level EPs provide the following core activities:

  • Consultation and advice
  • Psychological assessments and evidence-informed interventions
  • Delivery of professional development and training
  • Research and evaluation

EPs also provide critical incident support to education settings in the event of an unexpected death or serious injury to a pupil or member of staff. Information about this is in the leaflet below How educational psychologists help education settings manage critical incidents

Examples of the range of work activities the Service is currently involved with is in the leaflet below Core activities of the Service.

All our work focuses on promoting equal opportunities and inclusion for children and young people. In particular those who are most vulnerable. For example, have special educational needs and/or disability, are or have been looked after, are at risk of social or educational exclusion).

For the majority of time, EPs provide psychological services to support children and young people in education settings. EPs are most effective when they work together with the adults who have regular and direct contact with the child/young person - usually staff in the education setting and parents/carers. EPs help the adults to have a better understanding of the child/young person’s needs which then helps them to develop a plan to support the child/young person

EPs provide psychological advice and support to others by using a consultation model and information about this model will be uploaded on this webpage soon

Sometimes, EPs find it helpful to meet and work directly with a child/young person. This is always with the parent/carers consent and the agreement of the child/young person. EPs sometimes observe the child/young person learning, ask them their views of what’s going well and what areas they feel they need support with. EPs might also ask them to complete assessments which can help identify particular learning and wellbeing strengths and areas of need.

Further information about what we do to support children and young people with SEND, including the types of assessments we carry out, can be found in the leaflet below. How educational psychologists support children and young people with SEND

EPs work to support children and young people with a range of SEND or who have particular vulnerabilities, including those who are looked after or have previously been looked after. Information about Children looked after can be found here: https://www.eastriding.gov.uk/living/children-and-families/childrens-social-care/children-in-care/vulnerable-children-education-team/ . EPs have produced booklets for schools and for early years settings to help them support Children Looked After and these can be found on the webpage above and below (add CLA leaflets)

Access to this service

When an education setting (usually the School’s SENCo) has identified that a child/young person has special educational needs and/or a disability (SEND), the setting is required to put in place strategies and interventions to try to address the areas of need as part of the ‘graduated response’. Information about the graduated response can be found on the Local Offer here http://eastridinglocaloffer.org.uk/education/education-support/special-educational-needs-support-in-schools/

Many children/young people with SEND do not need involvement by an EP. However, if there are significant concerns about the child/young person’s progress, then the SENCo, with parent/carer consent, can seek advice from an EP at one of the planning meetings which take place between the SENCo and the education settings EP.

For preschool children attending a private, voluntary or independent early years setting, access to support from an EP is through discussion with East Riding’s Early Years Support Team. Information about the Early Years Support Team can be found here http://eastridinglocaloffer.org.uk/care-and-support/early-years-and-childcare/early-years-support/     Information about how EPs support pre-school children can be found in the leaflet below How educational Psychologists support pre-school children with SEND

If, after these discussions, the EP agrees there will be benefit from their involvement, the SENCo and parent/carer is asked to complete a ‘Request for involvement by an educational psychologist form’ which is below. After the EP receives this, a consultation meeting is arranged to discuss the concerns and agree how best the EP can become involved to help.

Any parent/carer who has concerns about their child’s learning is advised to discuss their worries with the education setting’s SENCo in the first instance. Similarly, if a child/young person is worried about how they are getting on at school, we advise them to speak to their parent/carer and to the SENCo or another trusted member of the school staff.

We have developed a leaflet for parents/carers which explains the role of an EP. Information for parents and carers and a leaflet for children/young people which explains what we do Information for children and young people at school. Both leaflets are below

If other professionals, such as a GP or Speech and Language Therapist has concerns about a child/young person and feel there may be a role for an EP, they are advised to discuss their concerns with the education setting’s SENCo, who can consider if involvement by the EP if appropriate.

Who this service is for

We provide consultation and psychological advice to educational settings in the East Riding of Yorkshire Council. We work to support children/young people with a range of special educational needs and vulnerabilities. A child/young person does not need to have a medical diagnosis (eg Autism) for us to become involved and children/young people with a diagnosis don’t automatically need involvement by our Service.

If a parent/carer is looking for an assessment because they think their child may have Autism, then it is the East Yorkshire Children’s Autism Team (EYCAT) that agrees to and carries out the assessment for Autism. Information about EYCAT can be found here

The following services can refer a child or young person to EYCAT:

  • Speech and Language Therapy
  • Portage Service
  • Educational Psychology Service
  • Community Paediatrics
  • Children and Adolescents Mental Health Service (CAMHS)
  • Children’s Learning Disability Team 

An EP would consider making a referral to EYCAT if they are already involved with the children/young people and where Autism is considered to be a factor contributing towards the child/young person’s special educational needs. This referral to EYCAT would be made with the parent/carer/young person's consent.

How we communicate with children, young people with SEND and their families

Parents/carers are always invited to the consultation meetings and the review meetings and may want to be present if any individual work is carried out with their child. We always provide a written record following a consultation meeting, and a written record of all work we do with a child/young person (eg observation, individual meetings) is send to the family and the education setting. We are always happy to meet with parents/carers to discuss and explain what we’ve written.

All information we collect and store about children and young people is respected and looked after in line with GDPR requirements (General Data Protection Regulation)

We would like to hear back from children or young people

Are you a child or young person, or a family with child or young person who has worked with this team directly? If the answer is yes we would like to hear about the experience you had whilst working with them.

Please follow the link below for the opportunity to feedback directly to the team, and all feedback is anonymous.

Smartsurvey - Children's and Young People's Feedback Survey (external website)

Costs

Free

Opening times

Mondays 8.30am-5pm

Tuesdays 8.30am-5pm

Wednesdays 8.30am-5pm

Thursdays 8.30am-5pm

Fridays 8.30am-4.30pm

Saturdays Closed (answer machine available)

Sundays Closed (answer machine available)

Age
0-25
How to access
  • Your school, nursery or children's centre can refer you
Who is this for?
  • Any type of disability or learning difficulty
  • Anyone with a disability or SEN, diagnosis not needed.
Family involvement
  • Family can take part fully